ENGLISH (ENG)

ENG-COMPS COMPREHENSIVES UG (0 Credits)

ENG-ELEC ENGLISH ELECTIVE (4 Credits)

ENG-100 FUNDAMENTALS OF WRITTEN ENGLISH (3 Credits)

A study of conventions and skills involved in college-level writing. Course assignments emphasize academic argument and discourse as well as the construction of effective sentences, paragraphs, and papers. Required of students needing further preparation to succeed in ENG 101. Not open to students who have successfully completed ENG 101 or who have had ENG 101 waived.

ENG-101 WRITING I (3 Credits)

A composition course emphasizing writing foundations, including the development of a writing process with attention to generating content and addressing concerns of structure, style, syntax, and mechanics. Course assignments emphasize critical reading, writing, and argumentation skills, as well as professional and oral communication.

ENG-102 Writing II (3 Credits)

A composition course emphasizing writing as academic discourse, with attention to academic argumentation and expectations for research, structure, and style. Course assignments emphasize intensive research and disciplinary conventions, as well as professional and digital communication.

Prerequisite(s): ENG-101 or CLAR-110

ENG-103 WRITING FOR LITERATURE (3 Credits)

A course designed to further develop writing skills and critical abilities in literary studies.

ENG-104 HONORS WRITING II (3 Credits)

A composition course emphasizing writing as academic discourse, with attention to academic argumentation and expectations for research, structure, and style. Course assignments emphasize intensive research and disciplinary conventions, as well as professional and digital communication. This course is designed for students in the Honors Program. It achieves the same objectives and satisfies the same requirements as ENG 102: Writing II. At the discretion of the instructor, this course may do one or more of the following: cover additional topics, cover topics in more depth, require additional scholarly assignments beyond simply writing an extra paper.

Prerequisite(s): ENG-101 or CLAR-110

Restrictions: RG.HON

ENG-203 ENGLISH LITERATURE I (3 Credits)

A course covering English literature to 1800. This is required for all majors in English.

ENG-204 ENGLISH LITERATURE II (3 Credits)

This is a continuation of English 203, which is not, however, a prerequisite, and is an intensive study of English literature, 1800 to the present. This is required for all majors in English.

ENG-210 INTRO TO LIT: NARRATIVE (3 Credits)

An introductory study of the short story and the novel. Emphasis is on the development of critical ability to analyze the narrative in terms of its basic elements: plot, characterization, point of view and symbolic structure.

ENG-213 POPULAR LIT. (3 Credits)

Focused study in reading popular culture texts, organized around a singe theme, period, or medium.

ENG-213B POPULAR LIT. THE AGE OF SHAKESPEARE: A CULTURAL HISTORY (3 Credits)

Analysis of several types of popular literature: the western, the mystery story, science fiction, sports literature, with a consideration of the relationship between popular literature and the literature of high culture.

ENG-220 AMERICAN LITERATURE I (3 Credits)

A single semester survey of the outstanding literary figures of America from the beginnings to naturalism. Required for all English majors.

ENG-221 AMERICAN LITERATURE II (3 Credits)

Naturalism and Beyond. A study in Modern American writing emphasizing fiction (some drama) and including the works of Norris, Dreiser, Wharton, Lewis, Hemingway, Faulkner, Fitzgerald, O'Neill, Steinbeck, Miller, Updike and Bellow. Required for all English majors.

ENG-230 PUBLIC SPEAKING (3 Credits)

A course stressing the practical application of principles of effective speaking to various rhetorical situations. Course assignments emphasize professional and advanced academic presentation and oral communication.

ENG-250 ADV ORAL & WRITTEN COMM. (3 Credits)

A course grounded in the practical application of principles of effective oral and written communication in various rhetorical situations. Course assignments emphasize professional and advanced academic writing and presentations with an emphasis on disciplinary analysis and conventions.

Prerequisite(s): Take ENG-102

ENG-260 Professional Communication (3 Credits)

A course grounded in the practical application of principles of effective written, visual, and digital communication in professional contexts. Course assignments emphasize professional documents and genres, professional and disciplinary research, multimodal composition, and rhetorical concerns related to purpose, audience, and context.

Prerequisite(s): Take ENG-102

ENG-265 EDITING FOR GRAMMAR & STYLE (3 Credits)

Building on basic elements of standard English grammar and style, this course extends knowledge of these areas with the aim of providing skills required for editorial work in literary studies, including proofreading and copyediting.

ENG-270 CREATIVE WRITING NARRATIVE (3 Credits)

A course designed to develop basic techniques of narrative writing: character development, plot construction, structuring, point of view and time-space sequences. Emphasis will be placed on the short narrative, although some structural analysis of the novel will be studied.

ENG-271 CREATIVE WRITING: POETRY (3 Credits)

This course will explore poetry as a medium. Each student will write poems, and the work of all students will be studied in class and in conference with the instructor. The work of published poets will be used regularly to suggest possibilities and directions in both form and content.

ENG-272 CREATIVE WRITING: DRAMA (3 Credits)

A course designed to develop basic techniques of playwriting: plot construction, character development through dialogue and action, scene development and staging. Emphasis will be on one-act plays although structural analysis of longer plays will be made. Works of both students and established playwrights will be studied.

ENG-275 RHETORICAL CRITICISM & THEORY (3 Credits)

This class situates writing in the rhetorical tradition and thus foregrounds writing as a public and persuasive practice. Possible areas of consideration include the history of rhetoric, writing as public discourse, rhetorical theory, visual rhetoric, and topics in rhetoric. Student writing will focus on analysis, argumentation, and persuasion.

ENG-325 WRITING IN DIGITAL ENVIRONMENTS (3 Credits)

This course will give students experience writing in a range of digital spaces. Possible writing environments and technologies include blogs, wikis, websites, videos, podcasts, social media platforms, interactive and electronic fiction, video games, and virtual worlds. Students will develop skills and writing practices related to analysis, argumentation, creative writing, media production, design, editing, and coding. At the same time, the course foregrounds writing in specific digital environments and asks students to consider how these contexts shift and shape the act of writing.

ENG-326 DIGITAL RHETORIC (3 Credits)

This course will help students think critically about the ways in which digital technologies shape rhetorical and expressive practices. Possible areas of consideration include electronic literature, hypertext fiction, digital poetry, conversations in digital humanities, public sphere studies, the virtual, video games/procedural rhetoric, electracy, platform studies, and critical code studies. The course may allow students to practice writing in different digital spaces, but it foregrounds the writing or more traditional analysis papers focusing on digital rhetoric technologies, practices, and texts.

ENG-328 SMALL PRESS PUBLISHING & EDITING (3 Credits)

An introduction to small press production, this course examines the history of often overlooked literary publishers and editors within a range of material, social, and technological contexts. Students will analyze examples of small press editing, publishing, and distribution from Modernism to the present and consider how new digital platforms have altered the small press landscape.

ENG-329 BOOK HISTORY (3 Credits)

An introduction to the methods and theories of book history, this course examines books and other printed material, including texts published online, with the goal of expanding knowledge about reading and readers, the economics of publication, and the formats of written texts.

ENG-350 CREATIVE WRT: NARRATIVE II (3 Credits)

This course focuses on extensive fiction writing of short stories, coupled with reading and discussion of short fiction and novels directed at developing the craft of fiction. Students develop their writing through multiple workshops and revisions of short fiction directed at preparing work for presentation and publication.

Prerequisite(s): Take ENG-270

ENG-351 CREATIVE WRITING: POETRY II (3 Credits)

Advanced study of the sources, modes, and strategies of poetry, with attention given to sequences of poems and to the development of a personal poetic voice.

Prerequisite(s): Take ENG-271

ENG-360 MODERN POETRY (3 Credits)

A study of English and American poetry from 1900-1945, with the close attention to Yeats, Eliot, Thomas, Williams and Stevens.

ENG-365 CONTEMPORARY BRIT & AMER LIT (3 Credits)

Structural approach to British and American literature since 1945. This course deals with the poetry of Olson, Duncan, Creeley, Roethke, Ginsberg and Dickey, among others.

ENG-366 CONTEMPORARY BRIT/AMER LIT. (3 Credits)

Structural approach to British and American Literature since 1945. This course is concerned with the fiction of Mailer, Malamud, Pynchon and Barth, among others.

ENG-370 ENGLISH NOVEL 1740-1850 (3 Credits)

The emergence and development of the English novel from the beginnings with Defoe, Richardson, and Fielding to the Victorian novels of the Brontes, Thackeray and Dickens.

ENG-371 ENGLISH NOVEL 1850-1950 (3 Credits)

The beginnings of the great twentieth century themes of isolation and alienation as reflected in the novels of Hardy, Conrad, Lawrence, Joyce and others.

ENG-375 AMERICAN NOVEL TO 1865 (3 Credits)

A study of the development of the American novel from its inception to the end of the Civil War.

ENG-376 AMERICAN NOVEL, 1865-1920 (3 Credits)

A critical study of the American novel from the beginnings of the realistic movement to the end of World War I with emphasis on representative works.

ENG-377 WOMEN IN LITERATURE (3 Credits)

In-depth critical investigation of literature written by or about women. Concentration on works from the eighteenth, nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Focus on fiction.

ENG-379 AFRICAN AMERICAN LITERATURE (3 Credits)

This course provides students with a survey of major works by African American novelists, poets, dramatists, and essayists from the 18th Century through to the present day. The course will pay particular attention to how African American writers present themselves as authors and their interactions with and revisions of a white American literary tradition. By the end of the course, students will have examined the literature of American slavery, Reconstruction, the Harlem Renaissance, the Black Arts Movement, and contemporary black culture.

ENG-380 WORLD LITERATURE (3 Credits)

A study of selected masterpieces from non-English literatures, with special emphasis on those which are central to the culture of Western Europe.

ENG-390 LITERARY THEORY (3 Credits)

A study of major theoretical problems in literature through selected literary works. The course will address topics in the following areas: literature and the other arts, the function of literature in society, structural principles in poetry, narrative and drama, and levels of meaning in literary interpretation.

ENG-391 LITERARY CRITICISM (3 Credits)

A study of major critical approaches to literature through selected works of poetry, narrative and drama. The course will survey techniques in the following traditional and contemporary approaches: historical, psychological, archetypal, feminist and post-structuralist as well as the basic identities of classical, romantic and modern literary movements.

ENG-410 CHAUCER (3 Credits)

Consideration of The Canterbury Tales with special emphasis on modern critical interpretation and Chaucer's artistic technique.

ENG-423 SHAKESPEARE I (3 Credits)

Shakespeare will be studied as poet and playwright, against the literary, social and historical background of Elizabethan England. Critical reading of representative plays from the comedies and histories.

ENG-424 SHAKESPEARE II (3 Credits)

A continuation of English 423 which is not, however, a prerequisite. The plays studied will be taken from among the tragedies.

ENG-425 SHAKESPEARE AT STRATFORD (2 Credits)

After a five-week classroom analysis of three Shakespearean plays, students attend a performance of each play, on an early October weekend, at the Stratford Festical in Ontario. Travel expenses are not covered by tuition and thus a deposit is required to the instructor during registration period. Since different plays are studied each fall, this course may be repeated for additional credit.

ENG-490 SPECIAL TOPICS (3 Credits)

This course will provide students with a sustained examination of a specific topic, genre, form, period, or theme not offered elsewhere in the curriculum. It will enable faculty members to engage students in the classroom with their current research projects and also to provide an opportunity to try out courses that we may later seek to make permanent parts of the curriculum.

ENG-491 ENGLISH INTERNSHIP (1-3 Credits)

The English internship allows students to apply the skills and proficiencies they develop through their program in English in a professional setting. Each internship can earn between one and three credits. Credit value will be determined by the department chair (or a designee within the department) in light of hours worked, responsibilities, and duration of the internship, with a rough guide of 50 hours of internship equivalent to one credit hour. Internships may be taken during the summer or academic year.

ENG-498 SENIOR WRITING WORKSHOP (3 Credits)

This course allows students to complete a substantial writing project while drawing on skills developed over their time at Bonaventure. The writing project will be specific to the student's interests and can speak to any of the English department's areas of writing expertise: argument and analysis, creative writing, literary criticism, professional and technical writing, and digital writing.